Only one CCS bill remains active and it moves closer to becoming law.  Six of the nine House CCS bills were effectively killed in the House Natural Resources Committee. The two other CCS bills were voted down on the House floor. Those eight House bills could have effectively stopped most CCS projects around the state

We’re now past the halfway point of the session. Six of the nine House CCS bills have now been effectively killed in the House Natural Resources Committee. HB 10 and HB 35 were involuntarily deferred in this week’s committee meeting on Wednesday, which essentially means the bills were voted down. HB 10 sought to remove

HB 571 was heard in the House Committee on Appropriations on Monday due to a tax feature applicable to extracted carbon dioxide. As anticipated, it received a quick and favorable vote after an uneventful hearing and will likely be set for a vote on the House floor next week.

In stark contrast, an exciting and

HB 571 is expected to be scheduled for a vote on the House floor next Wednesday, April 26, or Thursday, April 27. HB 571 moved favorably out of the House Committee on Natural Resources and Environment on April 20, as amended[1]. The adopted amendments include the following: use of more precise language identifying

Week 1

Update (4/14/2023): And it begins. The House Committee on Natural Resources and Environment will hear Speaker Schexnayder’s House Bill 571 on CCS next Thursday, April 20 at 9:30 am. HB 571 would make comprehensive changes to the CCS statutes, including notice provisions to local authorities, allocation of funds to local authorities, and increased

Stay tuned for fireworks coming from the Louisiana legislature this year on CCUS.  The legislative session begins April 10, and one bill has already been filed to remove expropriation authority from all CCUS activity.[1]  Many more bills are expected to be filed.  A lot of media attention has focused on a CCUS project related

On August 30, 2022, the Texas Railroad Commission approved proposed regulations relating to Class VI wells utilized for injecting and sequestering carbon dioxide in geologic formations. This is an important step towards obtaining primary enforcement authority (or “primacy”) over the Safe Drinking Water Act Underground Injection Control (“UIC”) Class VI well permitting program, which currently

In a recent blog post, we discussed a proposed ordinance before the Livingston Parish Council to ban injection and disposal wells in Livingston Parish. Yesterday, the council unanimously voted to pass the ordinance, which places a one-year moratorium on injection and disposal wells. To read more, click here.

Disclaimer: This Blog/Web Site is made