This week EPA released the newest version of its environmental justice (EJ) screening and mapping tool, EJScreen 2.3. EJScreen is a mapping tool that combines environmental and socioeconomic data and is used to screen for potentially overburdened communities that may be affected by federal government programs and activities.
Continue Reading EPA Releases New Version of EJScreen

On July 1, 2024, the United States Supreme Court extended the deadline for challenging agency actions under the Administrative Procedure Act (“APA”), holding that the statute of limitations period does not begin to run “until the plaintiff is injured by final agency action.”
Continue Reading SCOTUS Stretches Statute of Limitations for Challenging Agency Actions Under APA

As we hit the halfway point of 2024, Louisiana is poised for significant legislative changes impacting civil procedure and litigation, energy, government, and insurance, among other sectors.
Continue Reading Louisiana’s Legislative Landscape: What’s New in 2024

On May 17, 2024, the Texas Supreme Court held that when a lease requires royalties to be paid on all gas sold or used off the premises, but the valuation point for said royalties is “at the well,” gas used off premises as fuel is deductible as a matter of law.
Continue Reading Texas Supreme Court Determines That Off-Lease Fuel is Deductible from Royalties Valued at the Well

On May 21, 2024, a group of 20 states, including Louisiana and Texas, filed an action in North Dakota district court challenging the Council on Environmental Quality’s (“CEQ”) finalized amendments to its National Environmental Policy Act (“NEPA”) regulations, arguing that the rule seeks expanded environmental review without statutory authority.
Continue Reading Louisiana and Texas Challenge CEQ’s Finalized NEPA Amendments 

In a recent decision, the United States Supreme Court held that Section 3 of the Federal Arbitration Act requires a court to stay a proceeding pending arbitration and provides no discretion for the court to dismiss the action. In Smith v. Spizzirri,1 the Supreme Court settled a significant circuit split on the interpretation

The availability of excess remediation damages, which are damages for additional remediation beyond state regulatory standards that can be pocketed by landowners instead of deposited with the court, has been a hotly contested issue in Louisiana legacy cases involving oilfield remediation claims governed by Act 312 (La. R.S. 30:29).
Continue Reading Liskow Secures Success at the Louisiana First Circuit Court of Appeal in Legacy Case Involving Excess Remediation Claims Under Act 312

As a matter of first impression, in Cheapside Mins., Ltd. v. Devon Energy Prod. Co., L.P., No. 23-40591, 2024 WL 886951 (5th Cir. Mar. 1, 2024), the Fifth Circuit held that an oil-and-gas royalties class action belongs in federal court based on its interpretation that the “principal injuries” prong of the CAFA local controversy

On March 11, 2024, Liskow lawyers Kathryn Gonski and Melanie Derefinko secured the denial of a motion to remand on improper joinder grounds and the dismissal of an intentional tort claim against Methanex, a major Louisiana plant owner, in Knight v. Turner Industries Group, L.L.C., et al., No. 23-469 (M.D. La.).  The court’s rulings

The United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit recently certified a question to the Texas Supreme Court asking what effect a free-use clause and an off-lease clause have on a royalty clause valuing royalties at the well. At issue was whether gas used as fuel off the leased premises could be deducted from royalties when the royalties were to be valued at the well under an oil and gas lease containing an off-lease clause and a free-use clause. Texas Supreme Court precedent provides that when a lease states that royalties must be valued on the gross proceeds received by lessees, free-use clauses do not allow for gas used as fuel off the leased premises to be deducted, but it is not clear on whether that same rationale would apply when royalties are valued at the well. Given that uncertainty, the Fifth Circuit could not confidently make an Erie guess on the issue and instead opted to certify the question to the Texas Supreme Court.
Continue Reading At the Well vs. Off the Lease: The Fifth Circuit Asks the Texas Supreme Court to Determine Whether Off-Lease Fuel May be Deducted from Royalties Valued at the Well